Overview

Headquartered in Plano, Texas, YANA Systems is a diversified IT Services company providing a range of services including private, public and hybrid cloud computing to database, cybersecurity and blockchain consulting and managed services.

Client:
YANA Systems Inc
Industry:
Information Technology Services
Services:
Cloud, Managed Services, Consulting, Cybersecurity, Blockchain & Cryptocurrency
Website:
www.yanasystems.com

The Start

YANA’s first foray into crypto mining came in early 2017 when leading currencies like Bitcoin and Litecoin were getting more and more exposure to the public. What started off as a small proof of concept with a few miners rapidly grew into a passion for building and maintaining large scale crypto mines. With YANA’s background in building data center infrastructure, all of the ingredients were already in place to learn about blockchain while doing something fun. But just like legendary pitmaster Aaron Franklin says about BBQ, “you can’t make good BBQ until you make bad BBQ” and such is the case when building out crypto mines.

Mine #1

YANA found a small data center in Dallas who had 1800 sq feet of space in a dedicated suite and was willing to permit us to directly meter our power load with the local utility. YANA worked with the data center manager to provision power, set the meter and build out the room to sustain the load.

The stats:

  • 1800 sq foot suite, raised floor, 8ft drop ceiling
  • 110 tons of AC
  • 18 racks with 25KW per rack Phase I
  • 9 racks with 25KW/ per rack Phase II
  • 2×300 kVa transformers

The good:

  • The data center was very flexible¬† and the rent was reasonable
  • Dedicated power meter allowed us to negotiate our own power rate
  • YANA rack mount kits gave us density and hot/cool air containment

The bad:

  • Long lead times for utility company delayed build out
  • Inside electrical build out delayed turn up of equipment
  • Inadequate cooling for the planned load
  • Mining difficulty increased while equipment sat idle

Lessons learned:

  • You can’t build a mine faster than your utility company works
  • You can’t build a mine faster than your electrician works
  • Heat removal is more important than matching BTU generation to cooling

Mine #2

YANA found a larger data center who had half of a 6,000 sq ft data hall available and was already hosting several small mining operations, but YANA was to be the biggest by far.

The stats:

  • 5MW+ of utility power to facility
  • 6000 sq foot data hall, raised floor, 20+ ft ceiling
  • 240 tons of AC
  • 46 racks with 25KW per rack (2 rows of 23 racks)
  • 6×300 kVa transformers

The good:

  • The data center had some great people who knew their stuff
  • The data center passed through their volume power rate to us
  • 240 tons of AC for 50 racks (25KW/rack) kept equipment chilly
  • YANA rack kits gave us density and hot/cool air containment
  • The overall aesthetic design was a true masterpiece

The bad:

  • The data center missed the first power delivery milestone
  • The data center missed the second power delivery milestone
  • Mining difficulty increased throughout all these delays
  • Higher cost structure than mine #1

Lessons learned:

  • Data center size doesn’t matter, delivering power on time matters
  • Cold air is nice for your equipment, but it doesn’t make you money
  • Data centers are a terrible place to mine (unless you own the facility)

Mine #3

YANA found a commercial building with heavy power delivered and multiple suites available for lease.

The stats:

  • 2×4100 sq foot warehouse suites with 20+ foot ceilings
  • 2 sets of 12×16 overhead doors in each suite
  • Custom aluminum intake air vents
  • 88K CFM of exhaust ventilation in each suite
  • 80K CFM of intake air in each suite
  • Pallet rack shelving to maximize height
  • YANA rack kits gave us density and hot/cool air containment
  • 6×300 kVa transformers

The good:

  • If you own the build, you are in control
  • Electrical build out time was amazing considering our previous issues
  • Lower utility bills using ambient airflow instead of AC

The bad:

  • July & August are bad months to build in a Texas warehouse
  • Not all sub-contractors are created equal

Lessons learned:

  • It is possible to mine in Texas in the dead of summer
  • Negotiate a fixed price power contract or pay the price later
  • Intake air, intake air, intake air…can’t get enough of it
  • Exhausting heat is key in a Texas mine!